DragonFly On-Line Manual Pages


SLEEP(9)	      DragonFly Kernel Developer's Manual	      SLEEP(9)

NAME

tsleep, ssleep, lksleep, mtxsleep, zsleep, tsleep_interlock, wakeup, wakeup_one -- wait/sleep/block for events

SYNOPSIS

#include <sys/param.h> #include <sys/serialize.h> #include <sys/systm.h> #include <sys/proc.h> int tsleep(const volatile void *ident, int flags, const char *wmesg, int timo); int ssleep(const volatile void *ident, struct spinlock *spin, int flags, const char *wmesg, int timo); int lksleep(const volatile void *ident, struct lock *lock, int flags, const char *wmesg, int timo); int mtxsleep(const volatile void *ident, struct mtx *mtx, int flags, const char *wmesg, int timo); int zsleep(const volatile void *ident, struct lwkt_serialize *slz, int flags, const char *wmesg, int timo); void tsleep_interlock(const volatile void *ident, int flags); void wakeup(const volatile void *ident); void wakeup_one(const volatile void *ident);

DESCRIPTION

The functions tsleep(), ssleep(), lksleep(), mtxsleep(), zsleep(), and wakeup() handle event-based process blocking. If a process must wait for an external event, it is put on sleep by tsleep(), ssleep(), lksleep(), mtxsleep(), or zsleep(). The parameter ident is an arbitrary address that uniquely identifies the event on which the process is being asleep. All processes sleeping on a single ident are woken up later by wakeup(), often called from inside an interrupt routine, to indicate that the resource the process/thread was blocking on is available now. The parameter wmesg is a string describing the sleep condition for tools like ps(1). Due to the limited space of those programs to display arbi- trary strings, this message should not be longer than 6 characters. The tsleep() function is general in its use and suspends the current process/thread until a wakeup is performed on the specified identifier. The process/thread will then be made runnable. The process/thread will sleep at most timo / hz seconds (0 means no timeout). If flags contains the PCATCH flag, signals are checked before and after sleeping, else sig- nals are ignored. The tsleep_interlock() function is similar to tsleep(), in that it queues a thread on a sleep queue, but it does not actually put the thread to sleep. This allows coupling tsleep with higher-level synchronization primitives. The pattern is: (acquire high level synchronization primitive) (test condition of interest) tsleep_interlock(ident, flags) (release high level synchronization primitive) tsleep(..., PINTERLOCKED, ...) For example, to implement ssleep(): spin_lock(&important_lock); if (important_condition == 0) { tsleep_interlock(ident, flags); spin_unlock(&important_lock); tsleep(..., PINTERLOCKED, ...); } The ssleep() function works like tsleep() while at the same time releas- ing the exclusive spinlock spin before sleeping and reacquiring it before ssleep() returns. This is an atomic operation, which guarantees that a wakeup() interlocked by spin will not be missed. The lksleep() function works like tsleep() while at the same time releas- ing the exclusive lockmgr lock lock before sleeping and reacquiring it before lksleep() returns. This is an atomic operation, which guarantees that a wakeup() interlocked by lock will not be missed. The mtxsleep() function works like tsleep() while at the same time atomi- cally releasing the mutex mtx before sleeping and reacquiring it in exclusive state before mtxsleep() returns. The zsleep() function works like tsleep() while at the same time releas- ing the serializer slz before sleeping and reacquiring it before zsleep() returns. This is an atomic operation, which guarantees that a wakeup() interlocked by slz will not be missed. The wakeup_one() function is used to make the first process/thread in the queue that is sleeping on the parameter ident runnable. This can prevent the system from becoming saturated when a large number of pro- cesses/threads are sleeping on the same address, but only one of them can actually do any useful work when made runnable.

IMPLEMENTATION NOTES

Unlike FreeBSD, the tsleep() function in DragonFly ignores priority information because it is not required by the LWKT subsystem. Sleeps without the LWP_SINTR flag set are assumed to be disk-waits, otherwise they are normal sleeps.

RETURN VALUES

The tsleep() function returns 0 if awakened, otherwise an appropriate error code is returned.

FILES

The various sleep functions are in /sys/kern/kern_synch.c.

ERRORS

[EWOULDBLOCK] The timeout expired. [ERESTART] A signal needs to be delivered and the system call should be restarted if possible. This only happens if PCATCH was set in flags. [EINTR] The system call needs to be interrupted by the signal. This only happens if PCATCH was set in flags.

SEE ALSO

ps(1), kmalloc(9), serializer(9)

HISTORY

The sleep/wakeup process synchronization mechanism is very old. It appeared in a very early version of Unix. tsleep() appeared in 4.4BSD. ssleep() appeared in DragonFly 1.6, zsleep() in DragonFly 2.0, and lksleep() and mtxsleep() in DragonFly 2.3.

AUTHORS

This manual page was written by Jorg Wunsch and modified for DragonFly by Hiten Pandya <hmp@dragonflybsd.org>. DragonFly 4.1 October 12, 2012 DragonFly 4.1